Without question their most testing time came in July 1916.

From January 1915 to March 1919 the Abbey was turned into a voluntary hospital, Hôpital Auxiliaire 301, operated by Scottish Women’s Hospitals(SWH), under the direction of the French Red Cross.

On arrival the staff found that the buildings were in a deplorable condition.

Before the war there was no malaria in Salonika, the marshy areas up north had few travelers during that time and the mosquitoes where confined to the that area.

War meant vast amounts of movement and malaria became endemic.

Agnes joined the Scottish Women’s Hospitals as Doctor and Bacteriologist.

Agnes worked at Royaumont Abbey 30 miles outside Paris.

The work load for the hospital was just unbearable, with most of the staff dragging themselves from day to day.

During her time in Salonika Ruth also witnessed and assisted in saving of lives in what was know as the great fire of Thessaloniki in August of 1917 when nearly a third of the city went up in flames.

In 1916 Evelyn as a nurse joins the Scottish Women’s Hospitals at Royaumont abbey, near Paris, France.

War had broken the tranquil and peaceful ambiance of the 13th century cistercian abbey.

They were dirty; there was a shortage of practically every amenity that they would need to run an efficient unit.